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Raise Kids

Corporate Time Work at Home

Is Time Your Friend? How to Move Towards the Life You Want!

Do you ever think to yourself, “Is this it?”

Wake up. Go to work. Come home. Play with the kids. Eat. Sleep. Repeat. Does this sound like your life?

On the one hand, routine is somewhat of a necessity in the life of a corporate mom – it helps keep the ship moving. On the other hand, there is the danger of never getting the chance to reach our full personal potential, and that routine becomes a rut.

As mothers, we are ready to do anything for our family, even if it means staying in a job we hate or find unfulfilling just so that we can pay the bills. Your intentions may be honorable, but eventually you will find yourself stuck in a seemingly endless cycle that leaves you feeling as though you’re not in the driver’s seat of your life. Instead, you are running endlessly on a hamster wheel. Days go by and blur together. Before you know it, a year has passed and nothing has changed. The goals you once had now seem impossible to reach.

Life can throw some unavoidable curveballs at you, and it may seem like you have no control over it – but most of the time, you do! Here’s how you can break that cycle:

Change Your Thought Process

This is YOUR life. Instead of wallowing in negative thoughts, take the time to acknowledge that yes, you may not have achieved your original career aspirations, but you can still do something about it. Sometimes things happen and it’s not always your fault, but it’s never too late to change your situation.

Psychologists suggest counterfactual thinking. This goes a step further than positive thoughts. For example, let’s say you’re not progressing because the job you have doesn’t pay enough and you are always behind on your bills. One way to look at it would be, “At least I have a job.” However, this will not prompt progress. Instead, shift your thought process to, “What can I do better?” or, “What solutions are available to me?” This type of thinking is known as solution-based thinking, which prompts action and progress.

Identify the Difference Between a Rut and a Routine

Do you remember what happened yesterday? Can you recall your feelings or what exactly was going on around you as you went through your day? If not, chances are you’re in a rut. Ruts tend to put us in “zombie mode” – simply going about our day zoned out and out of tune with ourselves and the world around us.

Snap out of it! Change your routine for a week and see what that does for you. This might look like taking a morning walk before you leave for work, getting up 15 minutes early to write in your journal, or ordering takeout one night and devoting the time usually spent cooking to a fun family game night. Slight alterations in your daily schedule will help you become more aware of yourself and your surroundings.

Leave Your Comfort Zone

“A ship in harbor is safe – but that is not what ships are built for.” – John A. Shedd

You may not feel fulfilled in your current job, but it feels safe – in a way. It pays the bills and offers some sort of stability for your family. Understandable, but what is it costing you?

Leaving your corporate job may feel scary. If you’re not ready to take the leap, start small.

Conquer Your Fears. New professional opportunities often loom so big they’re completely overwhelming, causing us to freeze up instead of taking action. Exploring your options doesn’t have to be a big deal. Have you always loved playing with images and graphics? Enroll in a graphic design class at your local community college. Have you always had a knack for sales and marketing and think you might want to go solo? Get your feet wet by joining a local professional association or meetup that’s focused on marketing. Want to spend more time at home with the kids? Take a week off work (use some of those sick/vacation days for once!) and give staying at home a try – it’s the perfect way to find out if you love it or hate it! It might be freeing, or it might be tedious – but at least you’ll know.
Stop Talking and DO it. Write that book. Go on that vacation. Take that dance class. Say YES to other interests in your life beyond work.

Work Smarter, Not Harder – Become a Work-at-Home Mom

The daily rat race may leave you feeling as if there simply aren’t enough hours in the day to get your work done and make time for the family, or even yourself. The truth is, time is limited. We all only get 24 hours in a day. Rather than regarding time as your enemy, turn it around and make time your friend. When you live a fulfilling life, everything else falls into place.

If your current job doesn’t fit your ideal rhythm, it might be time to explore other career options. Forget the excuses: working from home may be the solution you’ve been looking for. We at Moms Making Six Figures can help you make time your friend by moving towards the life you want. For more information about getting started on the path to your best life, call us at (858) 837-1505, or visit our website at momsmakingsixfigures.com.

Spotlight

Home with your kids while earning an income? It’s possible.

Four years ago this month, the most amazing little boy entered our world and forever changed our lives.  I was a middle school science teacher and loved being in the classroom; it truly was my passion!  I always thought I’d be a working mom, but after Bryce was born, I struggled with going back to work because I didn’t want to miss anything in his life.  I eventually decided to go back because I had worked so hard for my degrees and teaching credential not to use them, plus I just couldn’t see myself not contributing financially to our family.  I told myself over and over that dropping Bryce off at home care would get easier, that I was so lucky to have holidays and summers off with him, but it just never got easier.  So, my husband and I decided that I’d finish off that semester, and then stay home with him.  I knew it was the best decision we could make for our family, but I really struggled with the idea of forfeiting my income stream and relying solely upon my husband.

I tried so many things over the last four years to generate income working from home.  I had my own accessory business, a direct sales company, plus so many other things, and none was ever as successful as I’d hoped or needed it to be.  One day, I was looking at work from home pages on Facebook, determined to find a way to create a meaningful income, no matter what it took.  That’s when I found my amazing business partner, Dana and her webpage, on which she lists different businesses that you can do from home.

I was on Dana’s sight one day and she had posted about an amazing opportunity she had found and had recently personally just gotten started.  I was very hesitant because I had just been burned by a direct sales company and I promised myself I was never doing that again.  But something about her post that day piqued my interest, so I checked out MomsMakingSixFigures.com to make sure this was a legitimate home-based business.  I absolutely loved what I saw and was very intrigued!  After speaking with Dana, I felt very comfortable and confident with the company.  I had finally found something I could completely see fitting in with my family, since I was already focused on eliminating toxins in our home to protect the health of my children and husband.  The products are truly amazing!.

Moms Making Six Figures has completely changed our lives in such a short period of time!  At first, my husband and I talked about how life changing just $500 would be for us.  But in just 3 months, I’ve achieved Director 3 and earned $3,568.29!  And because I know it’s real, I see such an amazing future with this company (though it still blows my mind)!  I know I was very hesitant at first because of my past experiences, but I honestly believe God put this company before me at the perfect time.  I’m confident that I can succeed in this business and so I’m simply not afraid to put in the time and effort it takes, while still enjoying the flexibility to be with my boys and family.    And what I love best of all is that through this business, not only am I helping out my family financially, but I’m able to help other women achieve the same goals, and it’s very rewarding!

 

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Have you found your passion?

“I’ve fought the fight – life lessons through a football great”

peyton manningYou may or May not be a sports fan. You may or may not be a football fan, but you would have to be living in a hole not to know who Peyton Manning is, and what significant event happened today.

You can call me different than many women. I grew up in sports. I now have only sons and our lives revolve around sports. I would not wish to have it any other way. I watched a man today cry his eyes out thanking the world for the career of a lifetime. I cried right along side him, by the way.

I’ve been lucky enough to meet a lot of professional athletes in my lifetime (including Peyton) – but I can tell you after the heartfelt speech that Peyton delivered today – I would be STAR STRUCK to meet him again. Not because of his stats of an incredible hall of fame career, but because of the man he is. Because of the role model of who little boys and young men should strive to be – OFF the field.

Father, brother, husband, son, friend, teammate, leader, ambassador to the community – he excelled at all.

Peyton thanked many, and had several quotes today that stick in my mind but a couple jumped out. First,

“There were other players who were more talented, but there was no one who could out-prepare me.”

There are so many lessons in this statement. He led from the front. He never asked his teammates to do anything that he also did not do first. He led with integrity, high standards, incredible determination and a no quit attitude. Everyone can learn from these attributes and apply to anything in life.

At the end of the day – Peyton over prepared – he was ready for anything that was going to be thrown at him , even adversity, injuries, critics, business politics, the media. But he never gave up. Peyton retired today after 18 years. He retired on top, with another championship. He’s leaving on his terms – no one else’s – the great people get to decide that.

It brings me to another thought. Training for football is what this man has been raised to do. So what now?

Yes, he has his wife and two young children, all the money in the world – but with his passion for the game – there will be a void. He answered that question best. To paraphrase, “I’m going to take a vacation. I am going to enjoy this time, but I know that whatever’s next its going to be the start of something great.”

This reminds me of a great quote I posted just the other day:

“The things that you are passionate about are not random. They are your calling.” 

So get out there and find your passion – I know #18 will.

Peyton also said, “football has taught me not to be led by obstructions and setbacks, but instead to be led by dreams. Because every moment, every drop of sweat, every bleary-eyed night of preparation, every note I took and every frame of film I watched was about one thing: reverence for the game.”

He concluded with a final thought. A scripture reading 2Timothy 4:7: “I have fought the good fight and I have finished the race. I have kept the faith,” I have fought the good fight. It’s time.

So I ask you this – what are you passionate about? Go find it. Because when you combine passion with a career – it’s a gift. NO one can take a gift away. I thank Moms Making Six Figures every day for giving me a gift no one can ever take from me.

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Marin Living: July 2015

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The reality of raising a family in the Bay Area (or anywhere in California for that matter) is that it truly does require two incomes. Tamie Scranton knew that she needed an income, but she also wanted to be a mom who was present and available for her three children.

After the downturn in the economy, she was no longer able to count on her income from the mortgage business. She knew she needed to find an alternative means of creating additional income, but she wondered whether that could be possible while maintaining control over her time.

Scranton was introduced to Moms Making Six Figures in 2011 by her cousin, Angie Gange. Gange shared that she had found a way to create a six figure income and be at home for her three boys. Scranton quickly saw the potential of MM6F. She saw that she really could have both. “I am the mother of three amazing teenagers! I know that may surprise you… not that I have teenagers, but that I would describe them as amazing! Here’s the thing… I want them to stay that way,” Scranton said.

Scranton and Gange weren’t alone. Heidi Bartolotta founded Moms Making Six Figures in December 2009 with that very goal in mind; having time for her children without sacrificing the ability to generate significant income.

Previously, Bartolotta had worked as a pharmaceutical sales representative, but after having her two daughters, she no longer wanted to work late and travel; she wanted to be home. Bartolotta said her team is comprised of women from very different education levels, backgrounds and work-styles.

Scranton says: “Honestly, finding MM6F has been such a blessing. My husband’s career is very demanding and our children are very athletic, so it was important that I be able to adjust my schedule around their activities. And being able to support them and let them follow their passions has paid off! We have two children who are college athletes!”

Looking to expand the team, Moms Making Six Figures encourages interested women to visit momsmakingsixfigures.com or call (415)  200-1291.

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Are You Raising A Good Sport?

20090123-Baseball BoysAhead of the Game: Raising a Good Sport

For kids, few things compare to the giddy elation of victory or to the crushing disappointment of defeat. Heck, it’s pretty much the same for adults. Our challenge as parents is to learn to temper these reactions, so we’re not raising whiny kids who scream Not fair! at every loss or who adopt in-your-face attitudes when they win.

Sound familiar? We’ve all experienced this at one time or another. It’s an important issue to address, as this behavior can lead to relentless arguments about scores, cheating, pouting at times of defeat, obnoxious bragging, quitting activities or making excuses rather than coping with loss.

Our instincts are to shield our children from every hazard and celebrate their triumphs. So it’s natural to want to let them win at a card game, overemphasize their role in their little league’s victory or even shy away from competitive activities to avoid potential disappointment. But we live in a competitive world. Sooner or later they will have to learn to deal with opposition without having a meltdown.

As a child, I never had that problem. My family still enjoys embarrassing me by sharing soccer game stories where our team lost because I would chat with other players on the field, unfazed by the ball rolling by. My son, on the other hand, can make a competition out of any activity. In the morning, he declares that he can make it downstairs first. At bedtime, he bets that he can put on his pajamas faster.

While amusing, this competitive bent mixed with his sensitive nature is a recipe for trouble, especially in our family. His closest relatives are his cousins, both varsity basketball players and intensely involved in the game. With March Madness in full swing, they fervidly root for their favorite teams, and my son, significantly younger than my two nephews, mirrors their enthusiasm. Unlike my nephews, when my son’s team loses, it’s a DEFCON 2 fit of despair.

The difference, of course, involves age and maturity, but my nephews have also developed a healthy understanding of competition by participating in sports themselves. They’ve learned to constructively accept loss, respect their opponents and cheer on teammates, even when it shifts attention away from their talents. This healthy attitude developed with encouragement from my sister and her husband. And my nephew’s skills spill over to other activities in their lives, too, from schoolwork to social interactions.

As my nephews have done, learning to face ups and downs with grace will go a long way to improving self-esteem and sportsmanship, even if your kid is an I-will-own-you-at-getting-ready-for-bed type. Not only will they find success in athletic endeavors, but in life as well. Following are 10 tips to help you teach your kids to be better sports, on and off the field.

1. Keep the focus on fun. Once you’ve settled on some activities that interest your children, have them explain to you what they like about each game. Remind them of those things when the scores aren’t satisfying. Whether they are rushing to you in excitement or schlepping home in defeat, always be sure to point out fun moments in the match.

2. Emphasize effort. Remind yourself that your child is not a professional. He or she is not getting paid to perform and therefore has no reason to worry about who is winning. Instead, concentrate your attention on their efforts. Praise ways they give 100 percent and reassure them that a loss or a win isn’t as important as doing their best.

3. Set goals. Help your kid decide what he or she wants to achieve. Maybe it’s to perfect their passing game or score more three-pointers. Or perhaps it’s to simply learn the rules. Whatever it is, keep their focus on achieving those skills rather than comparing themselves to teammates or agonizing over scores. Track their progress and use their setbacks as learning opportunities.

4. Model good behavior. Kids parrot their parents. When you yell at the TV after an opposing team scores, they learn that winning points is important, and, in turn, adopt those frustrations. Whether live or on television, check your conduct during games. Praise others for their efforts, respect the coach’s decisions and congratulate opposing players in front of your kid. They’ll learn from your example.

5. Provide consequences. If they can’t be a good sport, bench them. Once they’ve relaxed, explain to them, in terms they can understand, why they are being punished. Even if they are responding to taunts from an opposing player, explain, “We don’t talk like that on our team.”

6. Downplay celebrations. Teach your kid to keep celebrations low-key. One way to do this is to help them redirect their enthusiasm to the next play. Instead of gloating, they should be thinking, “What’s next?” Also, emphasize team efforts and the role luck plays in the game. “Good thing Jessica passed you the ball,” or “It was lucky the goalie jumped the wrong way.” Urge your kid to recognize excellence and effort in others and to give shout-outs when he or she sees them.

7. Commit to practices and games. It’s ok for your child to decide that a particular activity is not one they would like to pursue. However, they must learn to stick to current commitments. When you sign them up for a sport, teach them that it’s their responsibility to put in the work, sit on the bench when necessary and show up to every practice.

8. Minimize pressure. If your child decides they don’t like a sport or activity, don’t push it. Children who are pressured to do sports often get burned out. Set a balance with non-competitive activities and reassure your child that he or she doesn’t need to perform to make you happy.

9. Ask for input. Ask your kid the rules of good sportsmanship and write their answers down. This will help them consider and commit to better behavior, from respecting the coach to valuing teamwork, by giving them a voice on the subject.

10. Accept loss. When your kid inevitably loses a game, don’t feel too sorry for them or else they’ll put too much importance on the loss. Instead, help them congratulate everyone on the opposing team, identify problems, remedy deficiencies, reset goals and laugh at errors. This will help them realize that falling short of a goal doesn’t mean they are falling short as people and that we love them just the same.

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7 Of The Most Creative Discipline Techniques From Parents

Creative Discipline

Raising kids, you have to deal with a range of misbehavior, from apocalyptic hissy fits to broken curfews. Unless, that is, you have the perfect child, like I do. Once, in response to bath time, my son thought it a fitting revenge to create a wall mural beside his crib using his diaper contents. Ah, the joys of parenthood.

Managing such conduct can be equally tricky, especially when tried-and-true time-outs and sticker charts lose their luster. Following are some techniques from parents who were up to the task.

1. Daily duties. To encourage positive practices, consistency is key. I know it seems as if we’ve told our kids not to leave their dirty clothes in the middle of the floor just short of a million times. But if we keep them engaged and the message the same, they will eventually get the point. Plus, regular routines will set your tot or teenager on the right track. Of course, a little coercion doesn’t hurt.

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(Note: Changing their phone passwords and holding remotes hostage are equally effective.)

 

2. Lock down. It’s a lot less threatening nowadays to send kids to their rooms as punishment when they have a wealth of technology to entertain themselves. Here is one parent’s modern alternative to house arrest:

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3. On point. After removing relevant privileges, consider providing a way to proactively earn them back. This will not only give your children a new-found work ethic and the satisfaction of achieving a goal, it’ll also offer you a break from routine responsibilities.

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4. Fear factor. Ok, ok. So studies show that fear doesn’t work as a long-term motivational technique. Furrowed brows and “Because I say so!” may put a stop to the immediate problem, but it will ultimately teach your child to use force with others as well as become sneaky to achieve goals. Still, this do-not-disturb sign may be an exception:

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5. Truth and Consequences. Sometimes explaining to your kids why they should or shouldn’t do something will give them a chance to think about how their actions affect others. Tell her that hitting her brother will hurt his feelings and help her relate to the situation (How would you feel if your brother hit you?). While you’ll likely be more effective if you say the behavior influences the unicorn population, we don’t recommend it.

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6. Attention, please. When you’re trying to make a point, be sure to get on your kids’ level. If they’re still young, crouch down on your knees and address them eye-to-eye. As they get older and more distant, use their interests as motivation to listen.

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7. Duck-and-cover. When you start to feel as if you need a time-out, just hold fast and let it pass. Perhaps this humorist, journalist, columnist and mother says it best:

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There aren’t any hard and fast rules when it comes to discipline. Though others may not approve, remember that you know your children best. Just take breath, stay cool and keep in mind, they’re just trying to figure it all out.

What creative ways do you teach your kids responsibility and consequences?