Browsing Category

happiness

article Career communication skills emotional expression happiness Life Hack Teamwork Work at Home Work-Life Balance Working Mom

Kindness Deserves a Seat at the Table, Whether in the Kitchen or the Boardroom

Inspired by the Harvard Business Review article, “Don’t Underestimate the Power of Kindness at Work”.

One of the unspoken challenges of working from home, working remotely, or working largely in isolation is the lack of authentic opportunities for social interactions with colleagues, management, and our professional tribe.  Many of us are seeing the lines of our home life and work life blur for the first time due to the pandemic, juggling the demands of childcare and Zoom meetings, and our working hours stretching late into the evening.  Our carefully established boundaries, routines and life as normal have been uprooted and our aptitude for kindness is essentially non-existent, all while our appetite for human connection becomes nearly insatiable.  We turn to social media to replace our face-to-face connections, which only furthers our inner turmoil and loneliness in a culture that seems to value division over unity with Keyboard Karen’s lurking in the shadows ready to add their vindictive two-cents to any, and every, post.  Is it any wonder that we have lost touch with one of the greatest attributes we can embody and the windfall of benefits therein?  It’s time to adapt to our new normal and to begin sprinkling kindness like confetti once again.


The Windfall of Benefits

With opportunities for ‘praise in passing’ limited by the pandemic, it is important to recognize the tangible benefits of kindness in the workplace.  A yearlong compilation of surveys conducted by Gallup found that recognition at work could help to, “reduce employee burnout and absenteeism, and improves employee well-being.”  Decades of research show that seemingly simplistic gestures like offering a compliment, words of recognition, and praise can help individuals to feel, “more fulfilled, boost their self-esteem, improve their self-evaluations, and trigger positive emotions.”  The affirmation offered by praise confirms our self-worth and contributes to our positive view of ourselves.

Next, the act of being kind contributes to our perceived sense of life’s meaningfulness.  When we are kind to others, it confirms our belief that there is more to life than ourselves.  These acts of kindness also change the way we see ourselves, as our reputation and esteem in the mind of others is improved.  We assess ourselves based on our behavior, so when we are kind to others we view ourselves as kind people, and therefore a good person.

Finally, giving to others makes us even happier than receiving from others.  In various studies, participants who complimented one another found that giving the compliment made them even happier than receiving one.  Compliments may seem trite, but the psychological steps taken to construe and offer a compliment are much deeper.  When we give a genuine compliment it requires us to,  “think about someone else—their mental state, behavior, personality, thoughts, and feelings.”  Thinking about others is a necessary step in feeling connected to them.  And this human connection, that we’ve all been desperately seeking throughout the pandemic, can lead to enhanced positivity in relationships ultimately driving our own happiness forward.

Bringing Kindness Back to the Workplace (Even If It’s Remote)

In order to create a culture of generosity and kindness within an organization, it is imperative that leadership leads by example. “By giving compliments and praising their employees, leaders are likely to motivate team members to copy their behavior and create norms of kindness in teams.”

Next, leaders can establish a time during Zoom meetings for a “kindness round”, close a call with an opportunity for employees to acknowledge each other’s work, or encourage a weekly “bright spot” submission in the weekly meeting notes.  Just a few moments taken out of the norm can have significant impacts on moral and social connection.  The key is consistency and an opportunity for peers to recognize one another publicly.

Finally, small spot bonuses, or tokens of appreciation, even if it’s ‘just’ a gift card for coffee or a thoughtful e-mail, can trigger the same psychological benefits of large acts of kindness without significant expense.


While we are busy switching loads of laundry, and prepping dinner between e-mails and Zoom calls, it can be easy to dismiss acts of kindness as frivolous.  But, if we can pencil in one small gesture of kindness a week, or a day for our colleagues, management and professional tribe, the overwhelming minutia of survival mode can begin to look a bit more like thriving for ourselves and others.  Our children are our best examples of unencumbered kindness, offering a hand picked dandelion, a smile to a stranger, or the last bite of their prized dessert.  Let’s become a bit more childlike and a lot less jaded; the world needs more kindness than Karen’s.

happiness problem-solving Success Uncategorized

Success is a process.

Success does not happen overnight. Despite what we all see on Facebook, Instagram and every other social media app you can think of, virtually none of the messages shared in those posts tells the whole story.

In fact, oftentimes I think we are all just selling each other lies, even though it’s often unintentional.

For example, the post of my two smiling daughters hugging and my caption about what a wonderful day we had spending time together, while true, completely whitewashes the days when I cannot convince those two little…darlings to get in the car without fighting over who is riding “shotgun.”

And with regard to travel, doesn’t it sometimes seem like everyone (except us) is going on these wildly romantic or adventurous vacations, painting the picture that their lives are perfect?

When I find myself going down this mental path, I’m usually quick to stop and remind myself that that post or photo is just a snapshot in time, and that I’m not seeing the whole, real story.

In the context of business, the same adage holds true; what you see in that post or article about someone’s recent success only captures a small part of the picture. I liken it to the iceberg metaphor; the success or breakthrough that captivates our attention is the tip, and all the blood, sweat and tears poured out over years of grinding it out is below the surface, hidden from view.

Make no mistake, however, it’s all there below the surface and consciously acknowledging that fact when we see such a post helps us to truly appreciate all that went into that person’s story of success, not just the climax.

At this year’s Oscar awards, actor Brad Pitt shared with everyone that he recognized his success did not happen overnight and that his success was in part due to those around him.

During his acceptance speech, Pitt shared how several people significantly impacted his professional life and helped him to become the successful actor he is today. Regarding close friend and fellow actor, Leonardo DiCaprio, Pitt stated: “Leo, I’ll ride on your coattails any day, man.”

With this one statement, Pitt acknowledged that some of the skills he has developed over the years were learned from observing fellow actors and incorporating aspects of their craft into his own “repertoire.”

I appreciated what Pitt said because it supported the truth that success is the result of building a solid foundation, working hard and developing relationships. This statement is true for any career path and in any industry.

In my business, seeking out people who support and encourage me to grow has been instrumental to my success. In turn, when I support and help others to grow, not only do they succeed, but my success is increased ten times over.

Guess what? This process takes A LOT of time. So, when you see a post of mine celebrating a success, please know that it was months – and possibly years – in the making.

I don’t use Facebook and Instagram or other forms of social media in search of likes, loves or influencer status. My purpose is to convey that MomsMakingSixFigures is a platform with which hundreds have had real success and that same success is available to you, too. I invite you to come grab ahold of our coattails and see where you can go.

Moms Making Six Figures supports, educates and mentors other women entrepreneurs as they walk their path to success. For more information about Moms Making Six Figures visit www.momsmakingsixfigures.com.

https://www.delmartimes.net/sponsored-columnists/moms-making-six-figures/story/2020-03-10/success-is-a-process

Goals happiness Personal

Self-Care is a necessity in setting goals not a luxury!

Year-in and year-out I see women around me throw themselves into their goals, only to exhaust themselves mentally and/or physically. Within weeks or months of setting their goals for the new year, they lose their passion and excitement and simply stop. What happened?

Simply put, they burn out. And then on top of their mental and physical fatigue, they feel like failures.

Read the full story here.

Career emotional expression happiness

The simple act of edification.

Have you ever heard someone speak so highly of someone else and thought “oh my gosh, I would love to meet that person!” Well, that simple act is called edification. The concept really is all about building others up in a thoughtful way. By implementing edification in your business, you are helping build the credibility of those around you. Edification helps creates excitement about what can be learned from the person you are speaking so highly of.

The biggest piece of edification is being sincere. Others will be able to see right through a disingenuous attempt of edification. Take the time to get to know others in your business, learn about what strengths they bring to the table and be excited to magnify their strengths to those around you. By implementing this tool, you will not only see growth in your business, but those you speak of will only become stronger, more confident and be overall more amazing at their work.

We hope this little piece of advice will help you in not only your business endeavors but your personal ones, too!

Children Family Freedom Goals happiness

My time truly belongs to me!

Meet Catherine!  She used to work Commercial Banking but decided to pursue a career with Moms Making Six Figures. Like many of us, Catherine was craving more freedom to travel with her family. Read on to learn more about her incredible story.

Can you give us a little of your background and family life? 

I grew up in San Diego, except for the four years I lived in France, starting when I was 18.  My mother immigrated to the United States from France when she was 24 years old and later married my Dad who is American, which gave me dual citizenship — American and French.  I studied International Business at San Diego State University and I participated in the double diploma program with a French Business school called ESSEC.  I ended up receiving a BA in International Business from San Diego State University and an International Business degree from ESSEC.  My husband, Sean, and I have two boys Connor (10), Mason (8) and a bichon poodle mix named Rocky.

I was recruited into Commercial Banking because of my sales background, business development skills and financial skills.  In this career is where I met Sean, who is also a Commercial Banker.  Prior to banking, I was an outside sales rep for a payroll company, and I started my career as a Financial Advisor with Merrill Lynch.

I really love France and I try to go when I can.  I was there in 2018 for two weeks and 2016 for 10 days. Before my trip in 2016, it had been nine years since I had traveled to France.  My husband and I were married in 2007, went to France and Italy for our honeymoon, and then had kids.

 What was it like living in France for those few years? How has that impacted your life?

When I lived and traveled in France and around Europe, it really opened my eyes. The experiences I had were amazing.  I grew so much and learned about many different cultures. I think experiencing other cultures allows us to be more open-minded flexible.  I gained a lot of confidence from traveling and living in foreign countries and I want the same for my kids. My burning desire is to live in France with Sean and our boys for six months before they go to high school.

Something unique about Sean is that he lived in Okinawa, Japan for three years while in high school because his Dad was a judge in the Marine Corps. (They moved all the time while he was growing up.)  Because of his experiences, Sean has the same appreciation for travel and culture that I do.  Some places we’ve been to already on our own or with the kids are Mexico, Fiji, Kauai, British Virgin Islands, France, Italy, and Indonesia.

How did you manage a career in commercial banking, traveling and raising a family? What were the sacrifices? 

It was difficult having a demanding career in Commercial Banking a raising a family. I constantly felt stressed, overwhelmed and feeling like I was not doing anything great.  My career made it tough to travel, as well.  Even though I had 3-4 weeks of vacation, I just felt guilty taking more than a week at a time.

I made a lot of sacrifices by working a Corporate job.  You are always on someone else’s clock, 100 emails a day, meetings and sometimes not being able to make important events in your personal life.  This year, I was not able to go on a family trip to Mammoth with Sean and our boys because of work pressure.  I can’t even begin to explain how upsetting it was for the entire family that I couldn’t be there…

What is your life like now that you are working with Moms Making Six Figures? 

My life is so much less stressful.  My time truly belongs to me.  Not only do I have more time to focus on my family, but feel I have a real opportunity to help people with their physical and financial wellness.  As I mentioned, my goal is to travel more frequently with the kids and Sean. I love that I can work from anywhere with Moms Making Six Figures. With this career, I can work around my kid’s schedule and still have time to travel with them.

While my banking career had its benefits, working with Moms Making Six Figures is so much more rewarding. I am so happy to be a part of this great team and love that I can help others achieve their dreams while I continue to work on mine.